Legal Tech

  • AI Document Co. DeepJudge Raises $10.7M To Expand Team

    Document management firm DeepJudge announced on Tuesday it has raised of $10.7 million in seed funding to scale its team to meet customer demand.

  • Law Firm Communication Tool Hona Raises $9.5M

    Law firm client communication tool Hona announced Monday that it's closed a $9.5 million Series A funding round to both expand its product capabilities and customer base.

  • Texas Bar Proposes Limits On Services From In-House Attys

    The State Bar of Texas said in-house lawyers working for companies owned by nonattorneys are barred from providing legal services to the businesses' customers unless the work meets specific criteria because otherwise, the companies run afoul of rules forbidding the unauthorized practice of law, according to a proposed ethics opinion.

  • iStock-1223790327.jpg

    Anatomy Of A Remote BigLaw Office: Lessons From The Link

    Four years since it launched in 2020, Husch Blackwell LLP's remote office, called The Link, has grown from 50 attorneys and business professionals to more than 700, with around a quarter of the law firm's attorneys practicing as part of the office.

  • Calif. Software Co. Hits UnitedLex With Copyright Suit

    California-based technology company Scalr Inc. has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against data and professional services company UnitedLex in federal court , accusing the Kansas-based company of continuing to use its infrastructure software after its contract expired on Dec. 31.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    This was another busy week for the legal industry as BigLaw firms expanded their reach and the U.S. Supreme Court term heated up. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse's weekly quiz.

  • Legal Tech Roundup: Valid8, FTI Consulting

    The arrival of two new executives in the legal technology space tops this roundup of recent industry news.

  • iStock-1931069059.jpg

    Litigators Favor Modernization And AI Amid Budget Pressures

    As litigation becomes increasingly complex and budgetary constraints loom, most law firms and in-house legal teams are prioritizing modernization and artificial intelligence as ways to do more legal work for less, according to a new survey on Thursday.

  • LegalTech Fund And Scopus Ventures Back LawPro.ai

    LawPro.ai, a startup that provides automation software for legal tasks, announced on Thursday the completion of a seed investment round for product and marketing growth.

  • Robin AI Launches Tool To Automate M&A Due Diligence

    U.K. legal tech company Robin AI said Thursday that it has launched a new tool designed to streamline due diligence in mergers and acquisitions, in a move that will save time by offering a cost-effective alternative to the multimillion-pound fees charged by top firms.

  • iStock-1434478098.jpg

    NJ Attys Flag Ethics Concerns, Lack Of Training With AI

    The New Jersey judiciary is planning to conduct continuing education courses on generative artificial intelligence after it said a survey of lawyers revealed low rates of knowledge and training around the technology. 

  • iStock-1220155890.jpg

    BigLaw Talent Wars Reach Congressional Oversight Attys

    Demand for experienced congressional investigations attorneys is at an all-time high, leading to lateral hires and the launch of new practices as firms rush to compete with the handful of established oversight market leaders.

  • iStock-1469770749.jpg

    Behind The Scenes With The Congressional Investigations Bar

    Congressional oversight is a strange beast: part litigation, part politics and part public relations. Oversight veterans spoke to Law360 about what the process looks like and the many pitfalls they try to avoid.

  • ASU Law Adds New AI Courses, Certificate Focus

    Arizona State University's law school announced the launch of a new artificial intelligence curriculum across its different degree programs.

  • oversight.png

    Nature Abhors A Vacuum: The Creation Of The Oversight Bar

    Just 15 years ago, congressional investigations were barely regarded as a full-on practice area, even in the D.C. legal world. The 2008 financial crisis — and a few pioneering attorneys — changed all of that.

  • EY US And Docusign Partner On Contract Intelligence

    Accounting giant EY and digital contract platform Docusign have formed a new partnership that will expand EY's contract intelligence offerings.

  • Contract Tech Provider Acquired By PE-Backed Tech Co.

    Contractify, a Belgium-based contract management software company used by legal and other enterprise teams, was acquired by the software and IT solutions company AXI Group on Tuesday.

  • commence.png

    Law Grads Told To 'Ride The Waves Of Change'

    In debunking a familiar quote shared by Apple's Steve Jobs and comparing working with colleagues to being NFL teammates, 2024 law school commencement speakers asked their future legal colleagues to allow space for their career aspirations to change and not underestimate the impact they can make — both individually and as a community.

  • Generative Text Still A Question Mark For Judges In Courts

    Generative text could become a boon for self-represented litigants, but questions remain about whether and how judges should use the technology, a panel of experts said Monday.

  • Pennsylvania Senate Passes Bill To Combat Deepfakes

    A new bill unanimously passed by the Pennsylvania Senate this week aims to push back against the growing use of artificial intelligence to create deepfake images and videos of pornography.

  • Australian Legal Verificiation Co. Atticus Raises $7M

    Australia-based document verification software company Atticus has announced the raising of AU$10.8 million ($7.1 million) to help scale its fact-checking software.

  • Fifth Circuit.jpg

    5th Circ. Won't Adopt Rule On AI-Drafted Docs

    The Fifth Circuit has decided this week not to adopt a proposed rule requiring attorneys to verify that documents were not written using generative artificial intelligence, or if they were, that they were checked for accuracy by humans.

  • Compliance Software Co. Mitratech Acquires HotDocs

    Legal and compliance software company Mitratech Holdings LLC announced on Monday the acquisition of HotDocs, an automated document creation and management platform.

  • iStock-924520290.jpg

    Law Firms Roll Back Summer Programs In Tight Legal Market

    Law firms that can't find enough work for the deluge of prospective and newly minted attorneys already on their hands are tightening their pipelines for new talent this season, rolling back their summer associate positions for 2024, according to legal industry experts.

  • Summers_TS

    What Are Summer Associates Saying?

    Law360 Pulse asked prospective summer associates about how their top-choice firms distinguished themselves from their peers. Here are some of the ways.

Expert Analysis

  • How Firms Can Effectively Evaluate Their Summer Associates Author Photo

    One of the most effective ways firms can ensure their summer associate programs are a success is by engaging in a timely and meaningful evaluation process and being intentional about when, how and by whom feedback should be provided, say Caroline Cimei and Erica Fine at Shutts & Bowen.

  • Series

    Talking Mental Health: Life As A Lawyer With OCD Author Photo

    Kelly Hughes at Ogletree discusses what she’s learned in the 14 years since she was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder, recounting how the experience shaped her law practice, what the legal industry and general public get wrong about the disorder, and how law firms can better support employees who have OCD.

  • 'Blind Spots' Pose Major Hurdle To AI Adoption In Legal Tech Author Photo

    Legal tech circles have been focused on how to eliminate large language model hallucinations, but blind spots, or inaccuracies through omissions, are a rarely discussed shortcoming that pose an even larger risk in the legal space, says James Ding at DraftWise.

  • 3 Innovative Ways AI May Be Used In Legal Practice
    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly be used by outside counsel to better predict the outcomes of litigation — thus informing legal strategy with greater precision — and by clients to scrutinize invoices and evaluate counsel’s performance, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs Author Photo

    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • General Counsel And Legal Ops Must Work Together Author Photo

    It is critical for general counsel to ensure that a legal operations leader is viewed not only as a peer, but as a strategic leader for the organization, and there are several actionable ways general counsel can not only become more involved, but help champion legal operations teams and set them up for success, says Mary O'Carroll at Ironclad.

  • How Generative AI's Growing Memory Affects Lawyers Author Photo

    A new ChatGPT feature that can remember user information across different conversations has broad implications for attorneys, whose most pressing questions for the AI tool are usually based on specific, and large, datasets, says legal tech adviser Eric Wall.

  • A Model For Optimal Legal Tech Investment Strategy Author Photo

    Legal organizations struggling to work out the right technology investment strategy may benefit from using a matrix for legal department efficiency that is based on an understanding of where workloads belong, according to the basic functions and priorities of a corporate legal team, says Sylvain Magdinier at Integreon.

  • Personality Tests And Machine Learning Applications In Law Author Photo

    Mateusz Kulesza at McDonnell Boehnen looks at potential applications of personality testing based on machine learning techniques for law firms, and the implications this shift could have for lawyers, firms and judges, including how it could make the work of judges and other legal decision-makers much more difficult.

  • AI Is Reshaping Lawyering: What To Expect In 2024 Author Photo

    The future of lawyering is not about the wholesale replacement of attorneys by artificial intelligence, but as AI handles more of the routine legal work, the role of lawyers will evolve to be more strategic, requiring the development of competencies beyond traditional legal skills, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • How AI Legal Research Tools Are Shifting Law Firm Processes Author Photo

    Although artificial intelligence-powered legal research is ushering in a new era of legal practice that augments human expertise with data-driven insights, it is not without challenges involving privacy, ethics and more, so legal professionals should take steps to ensure AI becomes a reliable partner rather than a source of disruption, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Data Source Proliferation Is A Growing E-Discovery Challenge Author Photo

    With the increased usage of collaboration apps and generative artificial intelligence solutions, it's not only important for e-discovery teams to be able to account for hundreds of existing data types today, but they should also be able to add support for new data types quickly — even on the fly if needed, says Oliver Silva at Casepoint.

  • Bracing For A Generative AI Revolution In Law Author Photo

    With many legal professionals starting to explore practical uses of generative artificial intelligence in areas such as research, discovery and legal document development, the fundamental principle of human oversight cannot be underscored enough for it to be successful, say Ty Dedmon at Bradley Arant and Paige Hunt at Lighthouse.

  • Why I Use ChatGPT To Tell Me Things I Already Know Author Photo

    The legal profession is among the most hesitant to adopt ChatGPT because of its proclivity to provide false information as if it were true, but in a wide variety of situations, lawyers can still be aided by information that is only in the right ballpark, says Robert Plotkin at Blueshift IP.

×

Law360

Law360 Law360 UK Law360 Tax Authority Law360 Employment Authority Law360 Insurance Authority Law360 Real Estate Authority Law360 Healthcare Authority Law360 Bankruptcy Authority

Rankings

Social Impact Leaders Prestige Leaders Pulse Leaderboard Women in Law Report Law360 400 Diversity Snapshot Rising Stars Summer Associates

National Sections

Modern Lawyer Courts Daily Litigation In-House Mid-Law Legal Tech Small Law Insights

Regional Sections

California Pulse Connecticut Pulse DC Pulse Delaware Pulse Florida Pulse Georgia Pulse New Jersey Pulse New York Pulse Pennsylvania Pulse Texas Pulse

Site Menu

Subscribe Advanced Search About Contact