Courts

  • Feds Seek 20 Mos. For Ex-Baltimore State's Atty

    Prosecutors asked a Maryland federal court to sentence former state's attorney Marilyn Mosby to 20 months in prison after she was convicted of lying to obtain money from a retirement fund and conning a lender to obtain a vacation home, saying she "could not be trusted to tell the truth" despite her position of public trust.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    This was another action-packed week for the legal industry as BigLaw made new hires across offices and practices. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse's weekly quiz.

  • Coverage Recap: Day 11 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from Friday, day 11 of the trial.

  • The Week In Trump: All Eyes On NY As Other Cases Lag

    Donald Trump's Manhattan hush money trial took center stage with dramatic testimony from adult film actress Stormy Daniels, while the former president's criminal cases in Georgia and Florida ran into delays that could last through Election Day.

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    New Evidence, Old Politics To Collide In 2nd Menendez Trial

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and the government will face off Monday for the second time before a jury tasked with weighing bribery charges, a courtroom showdown that promises higher stakes — think flashier evidence and a more dramatic defense — than the corruption case the New Jersey Democrat escaped seven years ago.

  • DC Circ. Upholds Steve Bannon's Contempt Conviction

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday upheld former Trump aide Steve Bannon's conviction for contempt of Congress, rejecting Bannon's argument that he did not "willfully" flout a subpoena from the Jan. 6 House select committee because his lawyer advised him not to respond to it.

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    3rd Circ. Rejects Hunter Biden Gun Appeal, Trial Set For June

    The Third Circuit on Thursday refused to consider Hunter Biden's appeal of three Delaware federal court orders declining to dismiss felony firearm charges against him, an order issued the same day the lower court again refused to toss the indictment and scheduled the trial for June.

  • Daniels Defiant As Trump Atty Attacks Hush Money Account

    Adult film star Stormy Daniels was defiant on Thursday in the face of a grueling cross-examination by counsel for Donald Trump in the Manhattan hush money trial, who sought to discredit her account of a 2006 sexual encounter with him at a celebrity golf tournament.

  • Sens. Press Colleagues For Public Defender Funding

    Sen. Peter Welch, D-Vt., a former public defender, led a letter Thursday to Senate appropriators calling for the federal public defender program to receive its full funding request for the upcoming fiscal year. 

  • 9th Circ. Says Judge Defied Order To Revive Opioid Case

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday again revived a nearly 7-year-old case against a California doctor for allegedly selling opioid prescriptions and ordered that the case be reassigned, saying the presiding judge had defied the plain language of a previous order to reinstate the indictment.

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    Sen. Menendez's 2nd Bribery Trial: All You Need To Know

    In the wake of a 2017 mistrial on bribery charges, U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez reaffirmed his dedication to public service and vowed never to stop fighting for the people of New Jersey.

  • A Senator's Path From NJ Politics To Corruption Charges

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, the son of Cuban immigrants who climbed the political ladder from the ranks of a New Jersey school board to ultimately become chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is defending his reputation and career against federal corruption charges for the second time in less than a decade.

  • Coverage Recap: Day 10 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments to porn star Stormy Daniels ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from day 10.

  • Mich. AG Charges Pro-Trump Atty With Election Tampering

    A Michigan attorney is facing new criminal charges related to efforts to uncover fraud in the 2020 presidential election, as the state's attorney general accused her of handing over nonpublic voter data to an unauthorized person.  

  • Texas Court Urged To Keep Alive Judge Romance Suit

    In a flurry of filings, a former shareholder in an engineering company has pushed a Texas federal court to reject bids to throw out his lawsuit over an ex-bankruptcy judge's secret relationship with a former Jackson Walker LLP attorney.

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    3rd Circ. Judge Jordan To Retire In January 2025

    Judge Kent A. Jordan will retire from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit next year after serving on that bench for nearly two decades, Law360 has learned.

  • Philly Doctor Loses Bid To Restore $15M Bias Award

    A Philadelphia federal judge on Thursday denied a former Thomas Jefferson University Hospital surgeon's request to reinstate a $15 million jury verdict against his onetime employer, reasoning that the judge would have reached the same conclusion as a previous judge who vacated the award before recusing himself from a new trial.

  • Watchdog Seeks Texas Judge's Recusal In Noncompete Case

    An industry watchdog is calling on U.S. District Judge J. Campbell Barker to step away from the U.S. Chamber's lawsuit in Texas federal court challenging the U.S. Federal Trade Commission's new noncompete rule, citing "ample financial conflicts" including his investments in Amazon, Apple and IBM, two of which are members of the Chamber.

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    6th Circ. Nominee Sparks Debate Over Blue Slips

    Four judicial nominees were approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, including a Sixth Circuit nominee who has come under fire from Republicans for ethics accusations and whose nomination sparked a larger debate about the lack of blue slips for appellate nominees.

  • Congress Wants Wade To Testify About Fani Willis Romance

    A congressional committee on Thursday asked Nathan Wade, a former special prosecutor in the Georgia election interference case, to testify behind closed doors about his romantic relationship with Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis as part of its investigation into her motives for prosecuting former President Donald Trump and his allies.

  • Biden Taps Housing Atty, 2 More For Tax Court

    President Joe Biden nominated three attorneys Thursday to serve as judges on the U.S. Tax Court, including a housing attorney who specializes in federal low-income housing tax credits, a legislative counsel for the Joint Committee on Taxation and an IRS attorney.

  • Ex-Pharma Exec Asks 1st Circ. To DQ Judge In Contempt Case

    U.S. District Judge Mark Wolf cannot be impartial and must be disqualified from presiding over a criminal contempt trial against a former pharmaceutical executive accused of using an alias to flout a civil judgment, the defendant told the First Circuit in a Wednesday filing.

  • NYC Denies IVF Coverage To Gay Male Workers, Court Told

    New York City unlawfully discriminates against gay male employees by refusing to cover in vitro fertilization under its healthcare plan while providing heterosexual and lesbian workers with those benefits, according to a proposed class action filed Thursday in federal court.

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    Day Pitney Adds Former Cigna Compliance Pro In Conn.

    Day Pitney LLP has grown its government enforcement and white collar criminal defense practice with the addition of an in-house attorney at the Cigna Group who spent 16 years as a federal prosecutor in Bridgeport.

  • Justices Uphold Civil Forfeiture Standards Amid Abuse Fears

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that people whose property is seized during criminal investigations of others aren't entitled to a quicker process to seek its return, even though a majority of justices expressed concerns about the constitutionality of civil forfeiture systems in general.

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Expert Analysis

  • A Road Map For Creating Law Firm Sustainability Programs Author Photo

    Amid demands from clients and prospective hires for greater sustainability efforts, law firms should think beyond reusable mugs and create programs that incorporate clear leadership structures, emission tracking and reduction goals, and frameworks for reporting results, says Gayatri Joshi at the Law Firm Sustainability Network.

  • Why Firms Should Help Associates Do More Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    Associates may hesitate to take on the added commitment of pro bono matters, but such work has tangible skill-building benefits, so firms should consider compensation and leadership strategies to encourage participation, says Rasmeet Chahil at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Confronting The Stigma Of Alcohol Abuse In Legal Industry Author Photo

    The pandemic has likely exacerbated the prevalence of problem drinking in the legal profession, making it critical for lawyers and educators to address alcohol abuse and the associated stigma through issue-specific education, supportive assistance and alcohol-free professional events, says Erica Grigg at the Texas Lawyers' Assistance Program.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Have Duty To Push For Immigration Court Reform Author Photo

    Attorneys must use their collective voice to urge federal lawmakers to create an Article I immigration court outside executive branch control, helping address the conflicts of interest, political influence and lack of adjudication consistency that prevent migrants from achieving true justice, say Elia Diaz-Yaeger and Carlos Bollar at the Hispanic National Bar Association.

  • Series

    ​​​​​​​Ask A Mentor: How Can 1st-Year Attys Manage Remote Work? Author Photo

    First-year associates can have a hard time building relationships with colleagues, setting boundaries and prioritizing work-life balance in a remote work environment, so they must be sure to lean on their firms' support systems and practice good time management, say Jenny Lee and Christopher Fernandez at Kirkland.

  • 5 Ways To Lead Lawyer Teams Toward Better Mental Health Author Photo

    Attorney team leaders have a duty to attend to the mental well-being of their subordinates with intention, thought and candor — starting with ensuring their own mental health is in order, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • How Your Summer Associate Events Can Convey Inclusivity Author Photo

    As law firms begin planning next year's summer associate events, they should carefully examine how choice of venue, activity, theme, attendees and formality can create feelings of exclusion for minority associates, and consider changing the status quo to create multiculturally inclusive events, says Sharon Jones at Jones Diversity.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Negotiate Long-Term Flex Work? Author Photo

    Though the pandemic has shown the value of remote work, many firms are still reluctant to embrace flexible working arrangements when offices reopen, so attorneys should use several negotiating tactics to secure a long-term remote or hybrid work setup that also protects their potential for career advancement, says Elaine Spector at Harrity & Harrity.

  • What I Wish Law Schools Taught Women About Legal Careers Author Photo

    Instead of spending an entire semester on 19th century hunting rights, I wish law schools would facilitate honest discussions about what it’s like to navigate life as an attorney, woman and mother, and offer lessons on business marketing that transcend golf outings and social mixers, says Daphne Delvaux at Gruenberg Law.

  • 4 Ways To Break Down Barriers For Women Of Color In Law Author Photo

    Female lawyers belonging to minority groups continue to be paid less and promoted less than their male counterparts, so law firms and corporate legal departments must stop treating women as a monolithic group and create initiatives that address the unique barriers women of color face, say Daphne Turpin Forbes at Microsoft and Linda Chanow at the Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession.

  • Opinion

    We Need More Professional Diversity In The Federal Judiciary Author Photo

    With the current overrepresentation of former corporate lawyers on the federal bench, the Biden administration must prioritize professional diversity in judicial nominations and consider lawyers who have represented workers, consumers and patients, says Navan Ward, president of the American Association for Justice.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Retire Without Creating Chaos? Author Photo

    Retired attorney Vernon Winters explains how lawyers can thoughtfully transition into retirement while protecting their firms’ interests and allaying clients' fears, with varying approaches that turn on the nature of one's practice, client relationships and law firm management.

  • Why I Went From Litigator To Law Firm Diversity Officer Author Photo

    Narges Kakalia at Mintz recounts her journey from litigation partner to director of diversity, equity and inclusion at the firm, explaining how the challenges she faced as a female lawyer of color shaped her transition and why attorneys’ unique skill sets make them well suited for diversity leadership roles.

  • For Asian American Lawyers, Good Mentorship Is Crucial Author Photo

    Navigating the legal world as an Asian American lawyer comes with unique challenges — from cultural stereotypes to a perceived lack of leadership skills — but finding good mentors and treating mentorship as a two-way street can help junior lawyers overcome some of the hurdles and excel, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Coping With Secondary Trauma From Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    As the need for pro bono services continues to grow in tandem with the pandemic, attorneys should assess their mental well-being and look for symptoms of secondary traumatic stress, while law firms must carefully manage their public service programs and provide robust mental health services to employees, says William Silverman at Proskauer.

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