Ohio

  • April 04, 2024

    Wash. AG Defends Authority To Block Kroger-Albertsons Deal

    The Washington Attorney General's Office has told a state court that a local consumer protection law allows it to bring actions challenging anti-competitive mergers and urged the court to reject contentions from Kroger and Albertsons that the state lacks authority to block a nationwide deal.

  • April 04, 2024

    MV Realty Abusing Ch. 11 Process, Bankruptcy Court Told

    State prosecutors, federal agencies and consumer advocates have told a Florida bankruptcy judge that MV Realty is using the Chapter 11 process to avoid enforcement and enshrine a set of predatory agreements designed to extract millions in junk fees from homeowners over the next 40 years.

  • April 03, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive RV Driver's Ford Chassis Warranty Suit

    A Sixth Circuit panel has found that a lower court was correct to rule in favor of Ford Motor Co. in a potential class action claiming it is responsible for fixing alignment issues in recreational vehicles built with the car company's chassis.

  • April 03, 2024

    Hospital Workers' Vax Free Speech Suit Falls Flat At 6th Circ.

    The Sixth Circuit backed the dismissal of two workers' claims that a children's hospital violated their constitutional rights when it rejected their religious objections to a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, saying Wednesday they failed to show the hospital was a government actor.

  • April 03, 2024

    Amazon Book Scammer Can't Trim Prison Time

    The Sixth Circuit affirmed a 16-year prison sentence Tuesday for a man who scammed Amazon by renting textbooks from the e-commerce giant and then selling them at a profit, ultimately costing Amazon approximately $3.2 million.

  • April 03, 2024

    5 Hotel Cos. Defeat Trafficking Claims, 2 Others Settle

    An Ohio federal judge gave five hospitality companies early wins against a sex trafficking survivor's liability claims and dismissed two others following undisclosed settlement agreements, bringing an end to the survivor's suit alleging the companies should have seen warning signs and prevented what happened to her.

  • April 02, 2024

    Transportation Department Finalizes New Train Crew Size Rule

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration on Tuesday finalized a rule requiring freight trains to be operated with at least two people, forging ahead with a mandate long supported by rail workers' unions and safety advocates, but one that major rail carriers have decried as unnecessary and costly.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ohio Regulator Urges Justices To Review FERC Deadlock Rule

    The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Third Circuit's decision upholding a rule change from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that took effect despite a commissioner deadlock, arguing that the appellate court didn't apply a fitting standard.

  • April 02, 2024

    Another Judge Says Feds Overstepped With GHG Rule

    A Kentucky federal judge has sided with Kentucky and 20 other Republican-led states, ruling that the Federal Highway Administration overstepped its authority with a rule directing states to set targets for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • April 01, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Warns Of 'Trap' In Medical Malpractice Laws

    The Sixth Circuit has backed an Ohio federal judge's decision to toss a couple's claim against a doctor they say failed to provide proper prenatal care that could have prevented their child's brain damage, with one judge writing separately that the relevant laws can easily "trap unwary litigants" with their requirements.

  • April 01, 2024

    FDIC Dings 2 More Banks Over 3rd-Party Relationships

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. has ordered an Ohio community bank and a New York digital "hybrid" bank to strengthen their oversight of business partners, the latest in the agency's recent spate of enforcement actions over banks' management of their third-party relationships with financial technology firms and other outside companies.

  • April 01, 2024

    Lack Of Full Transcript Dooms Med Mal Verdict Appeal

    An Ohio state appeals panel has affirmed a verdict clearing a doctors' group from a woman's malpractice suit, saying without a full transcript of the trial, it can't conclude that the court was wrong to block her from presenting certain pieces of evidence.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Teacher, District Seek Wins In Pronoun Policy Bias Suit

    A former teacher and the Ohio school district she accused of forcing her to resign after she refused to use the preferred names and pronouns of her transgender students each filed briefs urging a Buckeye State federal judge to grant them early wins.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ohio Abortion Providers File Suit Over 24-Hour Wait Period

    A group of Ohio organizations filed a lawsuit Friday on behalf of abortion providers in the state, arguing certain longstanding abortion regulations violate amendments made to the state's constitution in November that protect access to abortion care.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ohio School Beats Race Bias Suit Over Pandemic Layoffs

    The University of Akron defeated a lawsuit alleging it targeted two finance professors for layoffs during the pandemic because one is Black and one is Asian, with an Ohio federal judge ruling Friday that the academics relied on faulty statistical analysis to back up their claims.

  • March 29, 2024

    Liberty Units Lose $13.3M Motel Murder Coverage Bid

    CNA and Chubb units have no duty to reimburse two Liberty Mutual units for a $13.3 million judgment stemming from a motel murder, an Ohio federal court ruled, saying no bad faith claim was asserted against the Liberty Mutual units triggering their errors and omissions policies.

  • March 29, 2024

    Sweeping Class Certified In Nationwide Pension Plan Suit

    More than 50,000 participants in a Nationwide pension plan can proceed as a class with claims that the company unlawfully transferred assets from the plan to a company subsidiary, as an Ohio federal judge ruled that questions about Nationwide's conduct outweigh differences among participants.

  • March 29, 2024

    US Steel-Nippon Merger Gets Thumbs Up From ISS, Glass Lewis

    U.S. Steel said Friday that proxy advisory firms Glass Lewis & Co. and Institutional Shareholder Services have recommended that U.S. Steel shareholders vote in favor of its planned $14.9 billion sale to Nippon Steel Corp.

  • March 29, 2024

    8 States Seek $122M After Robocaller Allegedly Ignored Ban

    Attorneys general from eight states urged a federal judge to modify an existing injunction barring a businessman from engaging in robocalling or telemarketing campaigns, asserting he has violated that order, should be held in contempt and must pay $122 million.

  • March 29, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Woes, Va. Ends Arena Plan, Pac-12 Deal

    In this week’s Off The Bench, MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani tries to untangle himself from a gambling scandal, Virginia’s rejection sends two D.C. pro franchises back home, and the Pac-12 pays up to two schools that were left behind. If you were sidelined this week, Law360 will catch you up with the sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 28, 2024

    Red Roof Inns Must Face Ohio Sex Trafficking Suits

    Red Roof Inns Inc. can't escape nine lawsuits over its purported role in sex trafficking, an Ohio federal judge ruled Thursday, saying the anonymous victims met pleading standards to allege the hotel chain knowingly made money through their victimization.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fitness Firm Wants TTAB To Ax Mountain Bike Co.'s TMs

    Workout products company Rogue Fitness has urged an Ohio federal judge to make the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office cancel a mountain bike seller's registration for its "Rogue Ridge" mark, arguing the USPTO's internal appeals board wrongly refused to do so when the fitness company objected.

  • March 28, 2024

    Former Prison Contractor Must Pay $112K, 6th Circ. Says

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday affirmed a National Labor Relations Board decision ordering a former Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor and a Michigan halfway house to pay around $112,000 to two fired workers, supporting the agency's conclusion that the entities are liable for back pay.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ohio Justices Split On Attorney's Sanction For Hiding His Past

    The Ohio Supreme Court has given a Cleveland attorney a six-month stayed suspension for omitting information in his application for a physician assistant license about multiple name changes and prior proceedings against him for having child pornography on his computer, which he had created via photo editing to demonstrate a point while serving as a defense expert.

  • March 27, 2024

    Justices Poised To Expand Repeat Offenders' Jury Trial Rights

    The U.S. Supreme Court appeared likely Wednesday to agree with the Biden administration and the criminal defense bar that repeat offenders have a constitutional right to let a jury decide if past offenses were sufficiently distinct to trigger lengthy prison terms under a prominent sentencing enhancement.

Expert Analysis

  • Seized Art Ownership Row Highlights Importance Of Vetting

    Author Photo

    The Cleveland Museum of Art's recent suit against the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to block a seizure order and contest its rightful ownership of a headless statue worth $20 million presents an uncommon challenge that underscores the criticality of due diligence prior to acquiring artworks, especially older pieces, say Robert Darwell and Zach Dai at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

    Author Photo

    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

    Author Photo

    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

    Author Photo

    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

    Author Photo

    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

    Author Photo

    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

    Author Photo

    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

    Author Photo

    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

    Author Photo

    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Class Action Defense: Don't Give Up On Bristol-Myers Squibb

    Author Photo

    Federal appellate court decisions in the six years since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb show that it's anyone's ballgame in class action jurisdictional arguments, so defendants are encouraged to consider carefully whether, where and when arguing lack of specific personal jurisdiction may be advantageous, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

    Author Photo

    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

    Author Photo

    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Expands The Horizons Of Debt Discharge

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel’s recent ruling in RS Air v. NetJets demonstrates that creditors should not be quick to conclude that their recoveries are limited if a debtor commences bankruptcy and receives a discharge, and should instead consider other potential paths for recovery, like alter ego claims, say Dania Slim and Claire Wu at Pillsbury.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Ohio archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!