Michigan

  • May 01, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Precedent Revives Salvadoran's Removal Fight

    The Board of Immigration Appeals misread precedent in finding that a Salvadoran man convicted of a misdemeanor under a Tennessee domestic violence law is barred from canceling his removal based on a disqualifying crime of violence, the Sixth Circuit has ruled.

  • May 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Scrutinizes Social Welfare In Tribe's Land Trust Bid

    The D.C. Circuit on Wednesday grappled with whether a Native American tribe's bid to compel the federal government to take land into trust for a casino venture would promote tribe members' social welfare, as one judge sounded wary of such a move's repercussions.

  • May 01, 2024

    DOL Announces $6.5M For Seasonal Farmworker Housing

    The U.S. Department of Labor on Wednesday said it will make $6.5 million in grants available to organizations working to improve housing conditions for seasonal and migrant farmworkers and their dependents.

  • May 01, 2024

    6th Circ. May Unbuckle Supplier From Seat Belt Parts Contract

    One Sixth Circuit judge seemed prepared Wednesday to free a supplier from a court order to continue fulfilling a seat belt system manufacturer's orders, indicating that he didn't think the terms of the companies' contract obligated them to each other long-term.   

  • May 01, 2024

    53 Govs. Want Say In Moving Nat'l Guard Staff To Space Force

    The governors of 48 states and several U.S. territories warned the U.S. Department of Defense that allowing hundreds of Air National Guard personnel to be transferred to the U.S. Space Force without the governors' approval undermines their authority over their states' military readiness.

  • May 01, 2024

    Tribe Fires Back At Feds' Brief In Enbridge Pipeline Row

    The Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians has called on the Seventh Circuit to reject in part the federal government's position in an appeal over the future of Enbridge Energy's controversial Line 5 oil pipeline.

  • April 30, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Say Fired Workers Can't Testify At Age Bias Trial

    The Detroit Tigers has told a federal court that a former employee who alleged the club made a habit of letting older workers go to promote younger ones shouldn't be allowed to have eight other departed or demoted staff members testify in an upcoming trial.

  • April 30, 2024

    Michigan Renews Judges' Power To Charge Court Costs

    Michigan trial courts can continue charging operational costs to convicted defendants after Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed legislation Tuesday reauthorizing the fees, one day before they were set to expire.

  • April 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Weighs Merits, Procedure In NLRB Severance Case

    The Sixth Circuit grappled Tuesday with a hospital's challenge to the National Labor Relations Board's ruling that it unlawfully offered severance agreements that muzzled workers, with one judge questioning how the agreements interfered with workers' rights and another whether the hospital was even entitled to oppose the new standard.

  • April 30, 2024

    Hospital Says IP Spat Shouldn't Delay Children's Center Build

    A Michigan hospital system has asked a judge to deny an attempt to block construction of a children's rehabilitation hospital, saying it did not copy its former architect's design and has made significant design pivots since terminating the firm's contract.

  • April 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Nominee Denies Ethics Accusations Again

    A nominee for the Sixth Circuit provided more detail to bolster his denial of claims of ethical misconduct during his time as a prosecutor, as outlined in a follow-up questionnaire.

  • April 30, 2024

    Mich. Judge Admits Error In Cutting Predatory Lending Claims

    A Michigan federal judge admitted she was wrong to toss fair housing claims alleging a group of real estate companies ran a bulk home buying program that preyed on Black buyers, reviving the claims and reversing a decision to cut a defendant from the case.

  • April 30, 2024

    NYC Law Firm Says Japanese Auto Supplier Owes $800K Fees

    New York law firm Florence Rostami Law LLC seeks more than $800,000 in legal fees and expenses after representing a Japanese auto part manufacturer in litigation and bankruptcy court proceedings in a contract dispute with a former vendor, the firm told a Michigan federal court.

  • April 29, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives Co.'s Malpractice Suit Against Ohio Firm

    The Sixth Circuit on Monday revived a Texas real estate developer's legal malpractice claim against an Ohio law firm, remanding the case back to a lower court to consider the viability of certain professional negligence claims.

  • April 29, 2024

    Kemp Klein Adds Bankruptcy Atty In Mich.

    Detroit-area-based Kemp Klein Law Firm has announced it hired a new bankruptcy-focused corporate lawyer to bolster its corporate, litigation and bankruptcy practices.

  • April 29, 2024

    Zoning Limits Cost Mich. Wineries $120M, Judge Told

    A group of wineries told a federal judge Monday that a Michigan township's zoning restrictions have caused the vintners to miss out on $120 million in profits and stifled their growth, while the township's lawyer said the damages ask is unreasonable and unwarranted.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    NY Mag Readers Say Privacy Damages Enough For Fed. Court

    New York Magazine subscribers told a Michigan federal judge that "simple math" would show they clear a $5 million federal court damages threshold to bring a class action alleging the publisher disclosed their data to third parties, urging the court to ignore the magazine's bid to toss the case.

  • April 29, 2024

    GM, LexisNexis Hit With Another Driving Data Suit

    A Michigan driver told a Georgia federal court that his auto insurance rate increased after General Motors and its OnStar unit collected his driving data without consent and shared it with third parties, including data broker LexisNexis Risk Solutions, which then sold the data to insurers.

  • April 29, 2024

    Builders Say State Rulemaking At Stake In Mich. PFAS Case

    A homebuilders' group has backed industrial giant 3M in urging the state's highest court to preserve a lower court ruling wiping out limits on forever chemicals, with a trade group official saying the decision could affect other state agency rulemaking.

  • April 29, 2024

    Fruit Co. Must Face Pollution Suit From Tribe, Enviro Groups

    A Michigan federal judge has ruled a fruit and vegetable company can't escape claims it unlawfully contaminated nearby wetlands with polluted wastewater discharges, saying the company's defense essentially ignores the primary theory of liability put forward by a Native American tribe and two environmental groups. 

  • April 29, 2024

    Excess Insurer Seeks Inclusion In OpenText Merger Row

    Allied World National Assurance asked a Michigan federal court to allow it to join a coverage dispute against its excess insured OpenText, maintaining that the software company's primary insurer will soon reach its limits on defense costs in the underlying class action over OpenText's merger with Covisint.

  • April 29, 2024

    Swamp Drowning Death Suit Sent Back To Trial Court

    The Michigan Court of Appeals won't let a man escape a wrongful death suit by the estate of a woman who drowned in swampland his camper was on, saying he had some control over who accessed it, and must face premises liability claims.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    French Auto Parts Co. Can't Nix Ford Supplier's $4.5M Suit

    A French automotive company can't evade a $4.5 million lawsuit accusing it of selling defective speed sensors that were later built into Ford vehicles, causing oil leaks and short circuits, a Michigan federal judge ruled, saying the company is subject to the court's jurisdiction.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 3 Significant Ohio Insurance Updates From 2023

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    The past year saw some significant changes and developments in Ohio's insurance coverage landscape, from new bad faith discovery mechanisms relating to out-of-state property to the Ohio Supreme Court's interpretation of what constitutes an assault or battery for coverage purposes, say Jenna Pletcher and William Peseski at Brouse McDowell. 

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • A Closer Look At The Federal Criminal Enforcement Slump

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    Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now at King & Spalding, explains that the U.S. Department of Justice’s statistical reports reveal that federal authorities are considerably less productive today than in the past, as criminal prosecutions fell in 2022 in every major category, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • 5 Securities Litigation Issues To Watch In 2024

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    There is yet another exciting year ahead for securities litigation, starting with the U.S. Supreme Court hearing argument next week in a case presenting a key securities class action question that has eluded review for the last eight years, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • A Look At Consumer Reporting In 2023, And What's To Come

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    The legal landscape of consumer reporting is evolving as courts, federal regulators and state legislatures continue to weigh in — and while last year may have seen a slight downtick in the overall volume of Fair Credit Reporting Act litigation, 2024 is set to be a watershed year for this area of the law, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Evaluating Retroactivity Of Mich. Drugmaker Immunity Repeal

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    In assessing whether a new Michigan law lifting drugmakers' blanket immunity from product liability suits will apply retroactively, there are four key factors that Michigan courts will likely consider, say Sherry Knutson and Brenda Sweet at Tucker Ellis.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

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