Georgia

  • May 02, 2024

    SEC Lands $25M Judgment In TikToker-Wannabe Ponzi Suit

    A South Carolina man and his companies must pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nearly $24.9 million to settle claims that he misappropriated investors' money to make Ponzi payments to earlier investors and to pay for luxury cars and over $1 million to TikTok creators, according to judgments issued in Georgia federal court.

  • May 02, 2024

    Allstate Secures Win In Untimely Ga. Storm Damage Dispute

    The Georgia Court of Appeals upheld a trial court's grant of a directed verdict in favor of Allstate in a dispute brought by two homeowners who claimed the insurer owed over $430,000 after it failed to cover all sums they believed were owed for storm damage.

  • May 02, 2024

    Sephora Hit With Bias Suit By Former Atlanta Manager

    A former Sephora sales manager filed suit against the company Wednesday in Georgia federal court, alleging she was fired for resisting pressure to tailor her hiring practices to the store's demographic customer base.

  • May 02, 2024

    11th Circ. Lets Georgia Island Dock Lawsuit Proceed

    A Georgia conservation group can resume its challenge to federal approval of a private pier on Cumberland Island after a divided Eleventh Circuit panel said regulators could conduct a more rigorous environmental review even though the dock was already built.

  • May 02, 2024

    Staffer Says Ga. School Can't Keep Racism Defense Straight

    An educator who last year sued an affluent Atlanta private school over allegations she was driven from her job after complaining of racist treatment urged a federal judge Wednesday to keep her discrimination suit alive, alleging the school has continually changed its story on why it fired her.

  • May 02, 2024

    11th Circ. Rules Tribal Co. Is Not Immune In Trade Secrets Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit has revived a tribal-owned defense contractor's suit against another tribal-owned competitor and a former employee for allegedly stealing trade secrets, finding the competitor agreed to federal court jurisdiction when it participated in the bidding process for work on a missile detection system.

  • May 02, 2024

    Morehouse Says Degree Issue, Not Bias, Led To Prof's Firing

    Morehouse College asked a Georgia federal judge on Wednesday to free it from all claims brought against it by a former professor who alleged he was fired for taking part in an HIV-positive student's discrimination lawsuit against the school and members of the cinema, television and emerging studies program faculty.

  • May 02, 2024

    11th Circ. Urged To Clear Final Hurdle To Interstate Water Deal

    As the finish line comes into view in Georgia and Alabama's decadeslong fight over water rights, the Peach State, the federal government and a host of local water providers are urging the Eleventh Circuit to reject a bid by environmental groups to block the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' management proposal for the Apalachicola watershed.

  • May 02, 2024

    11th Circ. 'Emphatically' Upholds JCPenney's Sanctions Win

    The Eleventh Circuit has affirmed a $63,000 sanction against an Alabama shopping mall amid its lease dispute with JCPenney, finding that the mall acted in bad faith by not notifying the court of a lack of diversity jurisdiction, eventually sinking the case — only after JCPenney won partial summary judgment and a later mediation failed.

  • May 02, 2024

    Atlanta Braves Deny Deaf Job Candidate's Discrimination Suit

    The Atlanta Braves denied that it refused to hire a deaf man for a top job at the organization because of his disability and said a lawsuit against the team was filed too late to be valid, according to a filing in Georgia federal court.

  • May 02, 2024

    Chiropractor Gets 6 Mos. For Defrauding NBA With 'Big Baby'

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced an Atlanta chiropractor Thursday to six months in prison for going along with former Boston Celtics forward Glen "Big Baby" Davis' fraudulent plan to bill the NBA for $112,000 of services that were never performed.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ala., Fla. Trans Patients Urge 11th Circ. To Heed Bias Ruling

    Attorneys representing transgender clients in Florida and Alabama have urged the Eleventh Circuit to heed a recent Fourth Circuit ruling striking down bans on state-funded coverage for gender-affirming medical care, saying the court ruled that the state policies violate federal law because their exclusions were based on gender identity and sex.

  • May 01, 2024

    Settlement Ends Texas Man's Injury Suit Against Ga. Winery

    A Texas man and Georgia winery have reached a settlement ending the man's suit alleging he was injured during a 2021 visit when a patio umbrella came out of its stand, fell on him and injured his hands, fingers, thumb and chest.

  • May 01, 2024

    Colonial Pipeline Says Contractor Bungled $22M Ga. Project

    A contractor hired to build a $22.4 million fuel terminal for Colonial Pipeline Co. in Georgia owes the company at least $600,000 because of missed deadlines, shoddy workmanship and failing to pay its subcontractors, a new suit alleges.

  • May 01, 2024

    No Relief For Fla. Adviser Convicted In $80M Trading Scam

    The Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday affirmed the conviction of a Florida investment adviser who bilked more than $80 million from the hundreds of people he persuaded to invest in a fraudulent company, after concluding he was not in custody when he made statements to the police.

  • May 01, 2024

    Activision, Microsoft Accused Of Addicting Georgia Gamer, 16

    The mother of a Georgia teen has accused major gaming companies, including Activision Blizzard Inc. and Microsoft Corp., of deliberately engineering addictive experiences intended to get users to play longer and spend more on in-game purchases.

  • May 01, 2024

    Muslim Recruit Says Atlanta PD Fired Him For Flagging Bias

    The Atlanta Police Department abruptly terminated a Muslim police officer recruit after he complained to management that fellow recruits had used profanity to mock his religion, scratched his car and stolen his uniform, a new lawsuit filed in Georgia federal court said.

  • May 01, 2024

    Georgia Co. Says City Must Pay $5M For Road Project Delays

    A Georgia paving company that sued the city of Smyrna for $5 million in damages after it allegedly pushed a multimillion-dollar road construction project past its completion deadline urged the Georgia Court of Appeals on Wednesday to overturn a trial court ruling that freed the city from its claims.

  • May 01, 2024

    53 Govs. Want Say In Moving Nat'l Guard Staff To Space Force

    The governors of 48 states and several U.S. territories warned the U.S. Department of Defense that allowing hundreds of Air National Guard personnel to be transferred to the U.S. Space Force without the governors' approval undermines their authority over their states' military readiness.

  • May 01, 2024

    In Trump Staredown With NY Judge, 'Somebody Has To Blink'

    Experts say Donald Trump will likely continue to ignore warnings from the court, and possibly his own attorneys, as his Manhattan hush money trial resumes Thursday with a fresh set of arguments over the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's out-of-court statements.

  • May 01, 2024

    Attys Say $5M Fee In Acella Settlement A Modest Proposal

    Plaintiffs' attorneys who recently reached a $46.5 million class action settlement with Acella Pharmaceuticals LLC over faulty thyroid medication asked a Georgia federal judge Tuesday to sign off on their $5 million cut of the deal as a "presumptively reasonable" proposal.

  • April 30, 2024

    Alaskan Builder Says Army Corps Delayed $41.2M Deal

    An Alaska construction company is protesting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' decision to boot it off a $41.2 million military construction project for delays, telling the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that the Corps caused the delays.

  • April 30, 2024

    Lender Alleging Fraud Asks Court To Block Golf Club Sales

    A lender accusing the owner of multiple Atlanta golf clubs of defrauding it of more than $4 million has asked a Georgia federal court to block upcoming golf course sales to avoid the "imminent risk" that the borrower would hide the proceeds and dodge attempts to recoup losses from the alleged scheme.

  • April 30, 2024

    $626M Fee Award In BCBS Deal Is Unjust, High Court Told

    A member of the class that settled multidistrict litigation with Blue Cross Blue Shield for $2.67 billion over anti-competitive practices has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up his challenge to the $626 million attorney fees award in the settlement, arguing the Eleventh Circuit's approval of the award runs counter to high court precedent.

  • April 30, 2024

    Red States Attack Biden's Title IX Gender Expansion

    A coalition of Republican-led states alleges the Biden administration illegally injected "gender ideology" in a rule expanding protection from discrimination in public education for people based on their gender identity or sexual orientation.

Expert Analysis

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • 5 Most Notable Class Action Standing Cases Of 2023

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    Key appellate class action decisions this past year continued the trend of a more demanding approach to the threshold issue of standing during each phase of litigation, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Still Murky After A Choppy 2023

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    This year brought several important Clean Water Act jurisdictional developments, including multiple agency rules and a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that substantially altered the definition of "waters of the United States," but a new wave of litigation challenges has already begun, with no clear end in sight, say attorneys at Nossaman.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Trump NY Fraud Trial Shows Civil, Criminal Case Differences

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    Former President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial currently unfolding in New York provides a reminder that civil bench trials can be just as damaging, if not more so, than criminal prosecutions, due to several key elements of civil litigation procedure, says retired attorney David Moskowitz.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

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