Florida

  • June 14, 2024

    Trucking Co. Whittles $11.5M Suit Over Stolen Cellphones

    A North Carolina federal court pared an $11.5 million lawsuit brought by a cellphone dealer and its insurer after a truckload of devices was stolen, reasoning that a negligence claim was preempted.

  • June 14, 2024

    Fla. Bar, State High Court Beat Atty's Racketeering Suit

    A Florida attorney who faces disbarment for "brandishing a dangerous weapon" was not wrongfully prevented from changing his status to "permanent retirement" instead, a federal judge has ruled, dismissing the disgruntled attorney's lengthy racketeering lawsuit against the Supreme Court of Florida and the Florida Bar.

  • June 14, 2024

    Florida Attorney, Philly Firm Settle Pay Dispute

    A Florida-based attorney who ran a side business as a litigation fee expert while also working for a Philadelphia-based personal injury law firm has settled her allegations that the firm stiffed her on a referral fee.

  • June 14, 2024

    Former IT Worker Wants Outright Win In FMLA Suit

    A former information technology worker asked a Florida federal court Friday to reconsider a win it denied him in his lawsuit alleging he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, arguing the court should have found his company acted illegally.

  • June 13, 2024

    Equipment Maker Looks To Chill Ice Creamery's Use Of Its IP

    A company that holds a patent for making ice cream using cryogenics has accused a Florida franchisor of falsely claiming to operate under a patent, saying in Washington federal court that the dessert purveyor has even been charging franchisees an "intellectual property fee."

  • June 13, 2024

    Paralyzed Motocrosser Fights To Keep Negligence Suit Afloat

    A motocross rider paralyzed during a practice run at the 2020 Supercross Championship pushed back against the American Motorcycle Association's bid to toss his negligence claim against it, arguing that the waiver the event organizer says relieves it of liability is not enforceable.

  • June 13, 2024

    Theater Co. Cites Prior Ruling Against Cruise Biz In IP Suit

    A Louisiana theatrical production company is urging a Florida state court to rule in its favor on damages in a lawsuit alleging Celebrity Cruises Inc. continued to use intellectual property beyond licensing agreements, saying the issue was already ruled on in a previous lawsuit between the same parties.

  • June 13, 2024

    Lockheed Should Face Toxic Exposure Suit, 11th Circ. Told

    A widower who sued Lockheed Martin Corp. claiming it exposed his wife to chemicals that ultimately killed her urged the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to reverse the dismissal of his lawsuit, saying a Florida federal court improperly excluded a key expert witness by not reviewing the evidence.

  • June 13, 2024

    Data Center Developer Secures Upsized $9.2B Investment

    Hyperscale data center campus company Vantage Data Centers on Thursday announced that it secured a $9.2 billion equity investment from DigitalBridge Group Inc. and Silver Lake, which is nearly $3 billion more than anticipated when the investment was first announced back in January.

  • June 13, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Adds Ex-Weiss Serota Employment Atty In Fla.

    Employer-side labor and employment firm Fisher Phillips is continuing its Florida growth with a new of counsel in Fort Lauderdale who is a former partner at Weiss Serota Helfman Cole & Bierman PL.

  • June 13, 2024

    Senate Panel OKs Fix For Federal Courts' 'Genuine Crisis'

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted out unanimously on Thursday a bipartisan bill to create 66 new and temporary judgeships to alleviate the federal courts' workload.

  • June 13, 2024

    Rains, Flooding Shut South Florida Courthouses

    Heavy rains that brought flash flooding to South Florida and prompted local leaders to declare states of emergency shut down courthouses throughout the area on Thursday because of concerns about safe access to flooded downtown areas.

  • June 12, 2024

    Fla. Court Revives Student Pilots' Deceptive Claims Suit

    A Florida appeals court on Wednesday revived a deceptive and unfair practices claim against the owner of a flight school contractor after finding that the former students suing him had presented enough evidence to support their claim.

  • June 12, 2024

    DeSantis Doesn't Have To Turn Over Judicial Advisers' Info

    A Florida appeals court on Wednesday affirmed the dismissal of a petition to force Gov. Ron DeSantis to turn over information about the conservative advisers he consults to vet judicial nominees, but refused to affirm the lower court's conclusion that executive privilege shielded the governor from producing the documents.

  • June 12, 2024

    Prosecutor Drops Extortion Case Against Fla. Securities Atty

    A Florida state prosecutor on Wednesday dropped a felony extortion charge against a securities litigation attorney who was accused of threatening to expose an accuser's criminal past if she didn't resign from their condominium board, saying an investigation revealed that there wouldn't be a reasonable likelihood of conviction.

  • June 12, 2024

    Microsoft, OpenAI Call Papers' Suit A 'Copycat' Of NYT's Case

    OpenAI and Microsoft Corp. have asked a New York federal court to toss the bulk of a copyright complaint from eight newspapers that accuses the companies of stealing their content to develop versions of ChatGPT, contending the lawsuit is modeled after one from The New York Times and saying the allegations mischaracterize the technology.

  • June 12, 2024

    11th Circ. Could Revive Venezuela Chemical Co. Seizure Suit

    An Eleventh Circuit panel appeared open to reviving a lawsuit accusing Venezuela of unlawfully seizing a chemical company amid allegedly trumped-up criminal drug charges, as the judges spent much of a hearing on Wednesday questioning why a critical witness was barred from testifying.

  • June 12, 2024

    League's Antitrust Case Against US Soccer, MLS Survives

    Major League Soccer and the sport's U.S. governing body must face allegations that they colluded to impose standards in a lopsided manner in order to hamper the North American Soccer League, after a New York federal judge refused to toss the claim.

  • June 12, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Rehear Ruling In Pratt & Whitney Cancer Case

    The full Eleventh Circuit won't review a panel's affirmation of a jury verdict win for defense contractor Pratt & Whitney that found it had failed to exercise reasonable care when disposing of radioactive materials but also freed it from liability for the pediatric cancer cases that emerged in a Florida neighborhood.

  • June 12, 2024

    32 AGs Urge Justices Take Up Okla. PBM Law Fight

    Thirty-two attorneys general urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up Oklahoma's petition for review of a Tenth Circuit decision holding that federal law preempted portions of a state law regulating pharmacy benefit managers, arguing the justices needed to intervene to resolve a circuit split.

  • June 12, 2024

    Loan Co. Owners Say SEC Improperly Expanded Receivership

    A couple accused of scamming 1,200 investors out of nearly half a billion dollars asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to reverse an order expanding a receivership of their merchant loan business, arguing their due process rights were violated when their personal assets were added to the receivership.

  • June 12, 2024

    Dershowitz Wants Jury To Decide Defamation Suit Against CNN

    An attorney for law scholar Alan Dershowitz told an Eleventh Circuit panel Wednesday the court should revive a $300 million defamation lawsuit against CNN, arguing that a jury should decide whether the news network is liable for intentionally omitting Dershowitz's statements in broadcasts over former President Donald Trump's 2020 impeachment trial.

  • June 12, 2024

    Pleading Flaw Sinks $1.5M Malpractice Award In Miami

    A Miami appeals court on Wednesday vacated a $1.5 million legal malpractice arbitration award against The Ferraro Law Firm, finding the arbitrator had not followed pleading guidelines fairly in awarding the seven-figure award to the firm's ex-client, Royal Merchant Holdings LLC.

  • June 12, 2024

    Saul Ewing, Atty Allowed 'Unconscionable' Lease, Suit Says

    A former Saul Ewing LLP client who is considered a vulnerable adult is suing the firm and one of its partners, claiming the lawyer failed to negotiate the "unconscionable terms" of a lease that required the client to take out a $400,000 loan and allowed his stepbrother tenant to pay rent one-seventieth the property's market value.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fed's New Internal Trading Policy Full Of Loopholes, Sens. Say

    Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., have called on Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome Powell to repeal what they say is a "failed approach" to addressing allegedly illicit trading by Fed officials, saying the long-awaited policy is riddled with loopholes, contains weak penalties and requires no transparency for officials who violate the trading rules.

Expert Analysis

  • The Clock Is Ticking For Fla. Construction Defect Claims

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    Ahead of the fast-approaching July 1 deadline for filing construction defect claims in Florida, Sean Ravenel at Foran Glennon discusses how the state's new statute of repose has changed the timeline, and highlights several related issues that property owners should be aware of.

  • Takeaways From Nat'l Security Division's Historic Declination

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    The Justice Department National Security Division's recent decision not to prosecute a biochemical company for an employee's export control violation marks its first declination under a new corporate enforcement policy, sending a clear message to companies that self-disclosure of misconduct may confer material benefits, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Deciphering SEC Disgorgement 4 Years After Liu

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    Since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2020 decision in Liu v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to preserve SEC disgorgement with limits, courts have continued to rule largely in the agency’s favor, but a recent circuit split over the National Defense Authorization Act's import may create hurdles for the SEC, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Wiretap Use In Cartel Probes Likely To Remain An Exception

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    Although the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division has recently signaled interest in wiretaps, the use of this technology to capture evidence of antitrust conspiracies and pursue monopolization as a criminal matter has been rare historically, and is likely to remain so, say Carsten Reichel and Will Conway at DLA Piper.

  • Where Anti-Discrimination Law Stands 4 Years After Bostock

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    On the fourth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock ruling, Evan Parness and Abby Rickeman at Covington take stock of how the decision, which held that Title VII protects employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation and gender identity, has affected anti-discrimination law at the state and federal levels.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Updated Federal Rules Can Improve Product Liability MDLs

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    The recent amendment of a federal evidence rule regarding expert testimony and the proposal of a civil rule on managing early discovery in multidistrict legislation hold great promise for promoting the uniform and efficient processes that high-stakes product liability cases particularly need, say Alan Klein and William Heaston at Duane Morris.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The Uncertain Scope Of The First Financial Fair Access Laws

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    With Florida and Tennessee soon to roll out laws banning financial institutions from making decisions based on customer traits like political affiliation, national financial services providers should consider how broadly worded “fair access” laws from these and other conservative-leaning states may place new obligations on their business operations, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Live Nation May Shake It Off In A Long Game With The DOJ

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    Don't expect a swift resolution in the U.S. Department of Justice's case against Live Nation, but a long litigation, with the company likely to represent itself as the creator of a competitive ecosystem, and the government faced with explaining how the ticketing giant formed under its watch, say Thomas Kliebhan and Taylor Hixon at GRSM50.

  • Opinion

    The FTC And DOJ Should Backtrack On RealPage

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    The antitrust agencies ought to reverse course on their enforcement actions against RealPage, which are based on a faulty legal premise, risk further property shortages and threaten the use of algorithms that are central to the U.S. economy, says Thomas Stratmann at George Mason University.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

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