Employment

  • May 16, 2024

    Flight Attendant Fights United's Bid To Exit Disability Bias Suit

    A former United Airlines flight attendant fought against the airline's bid to end her suit accusing it of firing her for not recovering from COVID-19 fast enough, arguing that the reason given for her termination — that she misused an employee travel benefit to travel to Florida while on sick leave — is not a legitimate ground to fire her.

  • May 16, 2024

    EPA Doctor Not A Whistleblower For Slamming Lead Plan

    A former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pediatrician and epidemiologist who publicly criticized the EPA's plan to reduce lead in drinking water as inadequate is not protected by federal whistleblower law, the Federal Circuit said Thursday.

  • May 16, 2024

    High Court Decision Requiring A Stay Raises More Questions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday finding that federal courts must honor a request to stay a case after ordering the dispute into arbitration leaves an important subsequent question unresolved: What happens if neither party requests a stay?

  • May 16, 2024

    Prosecutors Say Fake Fortune 500 Workers Funded N. Korea

    The Biden administration alleged that North Korea may have raised $6.8 million to develop nuclear weapons by installing remote information technology workers at Fortune 500 businesses, announcing charges Thursday against two individuals accused of helping agents pose as U.S. employees.

  • May 16, 2024

    Judge Calls Out 'Cancel Culture' In Prof's Suit Against Penn

    A Pennsylvania federal judge said University of Pennsylvania leaders embraced "cancel culture" when they chastised an anthropology professor for handling remains from the 1985 MOVE house bombing in Philadelphia, allowing the professor's defamation case against the school to move forward.

  • May 16, 2024

    NY High Court Blocks Doctor's Hospital Shooting Injury Suit

    New York's highest court on Thursday reversed a finding allowing a doctor to sue Bronx-Lebanon Hospital over his injuries from a 2017 shooting, finding that a lower appeals court was wrong to decide that a lack of evidence of the shooter's motivation rebuts the assumption that the injuries arose from his employment and fall under the state Workers' Compensation Board.

  • May 16, 2024

    ESPN Workers Drop Religious Bias Suit Over Vaccine Mandate

    Two out of three former ESPN workers who sued the sports media company and its owner, The Walt Disney Co., claiming religious persecution after they were denied exemptions from their workplace's COVID-19 vaccination requirement have dropped their claims, according to a Thursday notice filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • May 16, 2024

    FDIC's Gruenberg Scolded By Senators Over Agency Culture

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Martin Gruenberg on Thursday faced a second round of congressional reprimand from both sides of the political aisle over his agency's workplace misconduct scandal, but Senate Democrats seemed ready to let Gruenberg clean up the mess himself and continue his tenure.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Ga. Coach Says Earlier Race Suit Doesn't Bar Title VII Suit

    A former Georgia high school football coach, who alleged his contract was terminated because of his race, urged the Eleventh Circuit to revive his suit against the Valdosta City School District on Thursday, arguing the dismissal of an earlier suit against school board members does not bar this suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Firm Seeks To Force IRS To Process Worker Retention Credits

    A tax advisory firm helping businesses apply for the pandemic-era employee retention credit has asked an Arizona federal court to force the IRS to resume processing claims, saying the moratorium in place since September violates the Administrative Procedure Act.

  • May 16, 2024

    Penn Can't Dodge Fired Arabic Lecturer's Bias Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge declined to toss an Arabic lecturer's suit claiming the University of Pennsylvania fired him because he is an older Muslim man with arthritis, saying a jury needs to determine whether he got a fair review before he was terminated.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Execs Accuse Truist Of Hijacking Control Of Mortgage Unit

    Three former executives who spearheaded the real estate finance arm of Truist Financial Corp. before they left for a competitor are countersuing the bank for allegedly usurping control of the business, saying Truist then tried forcing them out to skirt paying severance.

  • May 16, 2024

    Fired MSU Coach Freed From Suit Over Abuse Accuser's Texts

    A Michigan judge on Thursday tossed a privacy lawsuit against former Michigan State University football coach Mel Tucker over the sharing of text messages from an anti-sexual violence activist who has accused him of sexual harassment.

  • May 16, 2024

    Detroit Tigers 'Evasive' On Docs In Bias Suit, Former VP Says

    A former Detroit Tigers vice president suing the baseball club for race, age and sex discrimination has accused the team of being "evasive" and stonewalling the release of key documents in the case, urging a Michigan federal judge to intervene.

  • May 16, 2024

    NC Sheriff's Surety Dodges Ex-Detention Officer's Bias Suit

    An ex-detention officer accusing a local county sheriff of Title VII violations has all but abandoned her claims against the sheriff's surety, a North Carolina federal court ruled, axing all claims against the surety and leaving only a sex discrimination claim against the Mecklenburg County official.

  • May 16, 2024

    Fla. Seeks To Halt Biden's ACA Trans Discrimination Rule

    Florida urged a federal court to stop recently finalized regulations clarifying gender identity-based discrimination under the Affordable Care Act from taking effect, saying the new rules would force the state to abandon its health and safety laws or lose funding from the federal government.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Bronx DA Worker Says Discrimination Suit Should Stand

    A former employee at the Bronx District Attorney's Office said Thursday she supported her claims that the office discriminated against her for seeking medical leave and denied her a promotion because she's Black, urging a New York federal court to keep alive her suit alive.

  • May 16, 2024

    Delta, Flight Attendants Ink $16M Deal To End Wage Suit

    Delta Air Lines flight attendants reached a nearly $16 million settlement with the company in an almost decadelong suit accusing the airline of wage statement violations, they told a California federal judge, saying the "extremely favorable" deal should be approved because it would give class members close to full reimbursement.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Must Stay Suits Sent To Arbitration

    The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded Thursday that federal courts do not have discretion to toss a case once it's decided that the claims belong in arbitration, ruling in a wage and overtime suit brought by delivery drivers against their employer.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Deadline To Appeal Furlough Denial Is Flexible

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday revived a Pentagon employee's dispute seeking an exemption from a furlough, saying that a missed 60-day deadline to appeal the denied exemption does not put the matter out of federal courts' jurisdiction.

  • May 15, 2024

    'Pissed Off,' 'You Need To Go': Reps Rip FDIC's Gruenberg

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Martin Gruenberg took withering, bipartisan criticism over his agency's workplace misconduct scandal at a House hearing on Wednesday, although no new Democrats joined their Republican colleagues in directly calling for his resignation.

  • May 15, 2024

    Chancery Nixes BuzzFeed Worker Arbitration Bid

    Delaware's Court of Chancery dismissed from an arbitration access dispute on Wednesday 85 BuzzFeed Media Enterprises employees who sued for arbitration of a stock conversion right, rejecting claims that company employment agreements require Delaware courts to handle the issue.

  • May 15, 2024

    Georgia Justices Weigh State Immunity In Trooper's Wage Suit

    Georgia's Department of Public Safety urged the state's highest court on Wednesday to undo a Georgia Court of Appeals decision that revived a state trooper's suit alleging that the department failed to pay him owed overtime for time spent in training, arguing that the state never waived its sovereign immunity privilege.

  • May 15, 2024

    2nd Circ. Calls Starbucks' Union Discovery Order 'Overbroad'

    The Second Circuit on Wednesday revived the National Labor Relations Board's suit seeking to halt Starbucks' alleged labor violations nationwide, finding that the lower court erred in tossing the suit for noncompliance with its "overbroad" discovery order granting the coffee chain's subpoenas seeking confidential union intel and workers' communications.

  • May 15, 2024

    Daimler Settles Worker's Suit Claiming Pot Test Got Him Fired

    Daimler Truck North America LLC has settled an employee's New Jersey federal court suit claiming he was illegally fired over a positive cannabis test following an accident in a company vehicle, even though he wasn't found at fault for the incident, according to a Wednesday court filing.

Expert Analysis

  • How Cos. Can Protect IP In Light Of FTC Noncompete Rule

    Author Photo

    While several groups are challenging the Federal Trade Commission’s recently approved rule banning noncompetition agreements, employers should begin planning other ways to protect their valuable trade secrets, confidential information and other intellectual property, says Thomas Duston at Marshall Gerstein.

  • Navigating Harassment Complaints From Trans Employees

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Copeland v. Georgia Department of Corrections, concerning the harassment of a transgender employee, should serve as a cautionary tale for employers, but there are steps that companies can take to create a more inclusive workplace and mitigate the risks of claims from transgender and nonbinary employees, say Patricia Konopka and Ann Thomas at Stinson.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

    Author Photo

    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • What To Expect From The DOL's Final Overtime Rule

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final overtime rule dramatically increases the salary threshold for white collar workers to be exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, so employers should prioritize identifying the potentially affected positions and strategically consider next steps, say Leslie Selig Byrd and Deryck Van Alstyne at Bracewell.

  • Data Shows H-2B Wages May Be Skewed High By Sample Size

    Author Photo

    Occupational Wage and Employment Statistics wage data from April illustrates that smaller sample sizes from less populated areas may be skewing prevailing wages for H-2B visas artificially high, potentially harming businesses that rely on the visa program, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Employer Considerations Before Title IX Rule Goes Into Effect

    Author Photo

    While the U.S. Department of Education's final rule on Title IX is currently published as an unofficial version, institutions and counsel should take immediate action to ensure they are prepared for the new requirements, including protections for LGBTQ+ and pregnant students and employees, before it takes effect in August, say Jeffrey Weimer and Cori Smith at Reed Smith.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

    Author Photo

    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

    Author Photo

    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • Compliance Strategies To Mitigate 3 New Areas Of AI Risk

    Author Photo

    The era of artificial intelligence-assisted corporate crime is here, but several concrete mitigation strategies can allow companies to address the new, rapidly evolving threats posed by deepfakes, information barrier evasion and AI model manipulation, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Refresher On Employee Qualifications For Summer Interns

    Author Photo

    Before companies welcome interns to their ranks this summer, they should consider the extent to which the interns may be entitled to the same legal protections as employees, including the right to be paid for their hours worked and to receive at least minimum wage and overtime, says Kate LaQuay at Munck Wilson.

  • Opinion

    The FTC's Noncompete Rule Is Likely Dead On Arrival

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's April 23 noncompete ban ignores the consequences to the employees it claims to help — but the rule is unlikely to go into effect provided the ideological makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court remains the same, say Erik Weibust and Stuart Gerson at Epstein Becker.

  • McKesson May Change How AKS-Based FCA Claims Are Pled

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s analysis in U.S. v. McKesson, an Anti-Kickback Statute-based False Claims Act case, provides guidance for both relators and defendants parsing scienter-related allegations, say Li Yu at Dicello Levitt, Ellen London at London & Stout, and Erica Hitchings at Whistleblower Law.

  • 5 Employer Actions Now Risky After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    Author Photo

    Last week in Muldrow v. St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that harm didn't have to be significant to be considered discriminatory under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, making five common employer actions vulnerable to litigation, say Kellee Kruse and Briana Scholar at The Employment Law Group.

  • Series

    Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!