Compliance

  • April 19, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Small Bank Loans, ULI, Lunar Housing

    Law360 Real Estate Authority covers the most important real estate deals, litigation, policies and trends. Catch up on this week's key developments by state — as well as on the rising regulatory focus on small-bank commercial real estate loans, takeaways from the Urban Land Institute's Reslience Summit, and an architect's guide to lunar housing.

  • April 19, 2024

    CFPB Seeks 5th Circ. Do-Over In Credit Card Late Fee Case

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is pushing for the Fifth Circuit to reconsider its rejection of a transfer out of Texas for a lawsuit challenging the agency's $8 credit card late fee rule, warning the decision was wrong on key facts and could prove a "boon for forum-shopping plaintiffs" if left in place.

  • April 19, 2024

    Don't Let The Rush Into AI Create Risk Blind Spots, Cos. Told

    As corporations increasingly adopt artificial intelligence capabilities into their workflows, they should also implement guardrails to stave off major risks the rapidly evolving technology poses, lawyers said during a New York City Bar panel discussion Friday.

  • April 19, 2024

    Thai Co. Pays $20M For 'Egregious' Iran Sanctions Violations

    Thai-based SCG Plastics will pay $20 million to resolve claims it committed over 460 "egregious" violations of Iranian sanctions by causing U.S. banks to process $291 million in wire transfers in connection with the sales of high-density polyethylene resin made in Iran, as well as obscuring the resin's origin in shipping documents.

  • April 19, 2024

    Trump Media CEO Fears Illegal Short Selling Is Harming Stock

    The chief executive of the company that owns Donald Trump's Truth Social platform wants Nasdaq's help in determining whether manipulation stemming from illegal short selling is harming the company's stock price, according to a securities filing on Friday.

  • April 19, 2024

    Employment Authority: Title VII Ruling Unanswered Questions

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on the unanswered questions the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that Title VII prohibits discriminatory job transfers left, how lower courts could decide how much transportation work can exempt workers from federal arbitration and a look at a workers' bid to unionize at a Volkswagen facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

  • April 19, 2024

    AI Co. Founder Faces SEC Suit After Fraud Charges

    The fugitive founder of a purported artificial intelligence startup was sued Friday by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over an alleged $2.8 million scheme to defraud investors.

  • April 19, 2024

    DOJ Can't Coordinate Google Ad Tech Discovery With Texas

    A Virginia magistrate judge on Friday denied a request from the U.S. Department of Justice to coordinate discovery in its suit accusing Google of monopolizing key digital advertising technology with a similar case from state enforcers pending in Texas.

  • April 19, 2024

    FAA Probing Rockies Coach's Mid-Flight Visit To Cockpit

    The Federal Aviation Administration on Friday confirmed it has launched an investigation after Colorado Rockies hitting coach Hensley Meulens posted a video of himself sitting inside the cockpit during a United Airlines team-chartered flight.

  • April 19, 2024

    IRS Previews New Digital Assets Reporting Form

    The Internal Revenue Service released a draft of a form brokers will have to use for the first time to disclose their digital asset sales to the agency, including instructions for taxpayers whose transactions are subject to the reporting requirements. 

  • April 19, 2024

    China Seeks To Boost Hong Kong's Status As Market Hub

    China's securities regulators unveiled several measures on Friday designed to boost Hong Kong's stature as an international hub and ultimately benefit both jurisdictions amid lean times for capital raising, according to statements from securities officials.

  • April 19, 2024

    Candy Crush Developer Gets Sweet Win In Fraud Suit

    A Virginia woman has been ordered to arbitrate her proposed class action accusing the Maltese developer of Candy Crush, the popular smartphone puzzle game, of fraudulently inducing her to drop more than $3,000 on a tournament by misrepresenting her chances of winning thousands of dollars and a trip to London.

  • April 19, 2024

    NY AG Doubts Trump Insurer Can Cover $175M Bond

    The New York Attorney General's Office told a Manhattan court Friday it has doubts about a California insurer's ability to cover a $175 million bond imposed on Donald Trump after a civil trial in which he was found responsible for conspiring to inflate his wealth for financial gain.

  • April 19, 2024

    Pa. AG Charges Shell With Hiding Pipeline Pollution Spills

    Pennsylvania Attorney General Michelle Henry announced Friday that she has charged a Shell subsidiary in state court, saying the company did not tell the state's Department of Environmental Protection about pollution problems it encountered while building a 45-mile pipeline in the Keystone State.

  • April 19, 2024

    Nevada Justices Stop Block On State's Ghost Gun Ban

    The Nevada Supreme Court has reversed an order blocking enforcement of state laws blocking the sale of so-called ghost gun kits, saying the lower court was wrong in finding the laws were unconstitutionally vague.

  • April 19, 2024

    Climate Lawsuits Aren't The SEC's Only Legal Headache

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has been grabbing headlines over the past couple of months as it attempts to fend off a host of lawsuits challenging recently enacted climate disclosure rules, but the agency has been no stranger to litigation brought by business groups opposing everything from new stock buyback disclosures to the agency's growing private fund oversight to its hands-off approach to crypto rule writing. 

  • April 19, 2024

    The Week In Trump: NY Trial And A High Court Date Loom

    Despite a few snags, jury selection for Donald Trump's hush money trial in Manhattan unfolded relatively quickly, clearing the way for opening statements Monday in the historic case as the former president prepped for a U.S. Supreme Court debate over his supposed immunity.

  • April 19, 2024

    Antitrust Case Judge Reveals Husband's Ties With Apple

    A New Jersey federal magistrate judge assigned to the U.S. Department of Justice's recent iPhone antitrust case disclosed on Friday that her husband has ties to Apple, but told the parties she does not believe she needs to recuse herself.

  • April 19, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Rules, Trans Athlete Win, NBA Pro's Ban

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NCAA formally lifted restrictions on athletes transferring schools and how they can receive name, image and likeness money, West Virginia's transgender sports ban is dealt a blow by the Fourth Circuit, and betting costs an NBA player his career.

  • April 19, 2024

    Ex-Pharma Exec Says Judge 'Coercive' In SEC Contempt Case

    A former pharmaceutical executive facing criminal contempt charges for using an alias to flout a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ban says a Massachusetts federal judge was "coercive" in suggesting he might avoid prosecution if he cooperated with the agency.

  • April 19, 2024

    EPA Says 2 'Forever Chemicals' Are Hazardous Substances

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday officially declared two "forever chemicals" to be hazardous materials under federal law, which could bring a host of consequences for Superfund site cleanups and development projects.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Can Stay Free During OneCoin Fraud Appeal

    A Manhattan federal judge Thursday granted a former Locke Lord LLP partner's motion for bail pending appeal of his 10-year prison sentence after he was found guilty of laundering around $400 million in proceeds from the global OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, saying he does not pose a flight risk given his medical conditions.

  • April 18, 2024

    SEC Faces $1.8M Atty Fee Bid After Sanctions In Crypto Case

    A court-appointed receiver and defendants in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's case against crypto project Debt Box requested Wednesday that the regulator pay roughly $1.8 million in sanctions to cover the fees incurred by an allegedly ill-gotten temporary restraining order and receivership.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy CEO Wanted Whistleblower Fired, Ex-GC Says

    Former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch thought a finance department whistleblower was "trying to destroy the company" and wanted him fired, the software company's former U.S. general counsel testified Thursday in a criminal fraud trial over claims Lynch conned HP into buying the British company at an inflated price of $11.7 billion.

  • April 18, 2024

    Citi Can Arbitrate Anti-Armenian Bias Suit, Judge Rules

    Citibank has won its bid to arbitrate proposed class claims that it discriminated against customers with Armenian surnames, as a Los Angeles federal judge found Wednesday that the plaintiff agreed to arbitrate allegations like these when she became a party to her Citibank card agreement.

Expert Analysis

  • Proactive Strategies Can Reduce Truck Cos.' Accident Liability

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    The legal complications of trucking accidents can be grave — so transportation companies and their attorneys should implement proactive strategies that include driver safety programs, pre-accident legal counseling, electronic monitoring and attorney involvement at crash scenes, says Mandy Kolodkin at Segal McCambridge.

  • What's In OCC's Proposed Freedom Of Information Act Update

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    In this article, Christine Docherty at Goodwin discusses the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's proposed amendments to its regulations implementing the Freedom of Information Act, and how these changes might align with guidance from other regulators.

  • Assigning Liability In Key Bridge Collapse May Be Challenging

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    In the wake of a cargo ship's collision with Baltimore's Key Bridge last month, claimants may focus on the vessel's owners and the agencies responsible for the design and maintenance of the bridge — but allocating legal liability to either private or governmental entities may be difficult under applicable state and federal laws, says Clay Robbins at Wisner Baum.

  • Binance Ruling Spotlights Muddled Post-Morrison Landscape

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Williams v. Binance highlights the judiciary's struggle to apply the U.S. Supreme Court's Morrison v. National Australia Bank ruling to digital assets, and illustrates how Morrison's territorial limits on the federal securities laws have become convoluted, say Andrew Rhys Davies and Jessica Lewis at WilmerHale.

  • Data Protection Steps To Consider After Biden Privacy Order

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    A recent White House executive order casts a spotlight on the criticality of securing sensitive content communications, presenting challenges and necessitating a recalibration of practices, especially for lawyers, says Camilo Artiga-Purcell at Kiteworks.

  • Highlights From The 2024 ABA Antitrust Spring Meeting

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    U.S. merger enforcement and cartels figured heavily in this year's American Bar Association spring antitrust meeting, where one key takeaway included news that the Federal Trade Commission's anticipated changes to the Hart-Scott-Rodino form may be less dramatic than many originally feared, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • What FERC's Disclosure Demands Mean For Cos., Investors

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    Two recent Federal Energy Regulatory Commission orders reflect the commission's increasingly meticulous approach to reviewing corporate structures in applications for approval of proposed consolidations, acquisitions or changes in control — putting the onus on the regulated community to track and comply with ever-more-burdensome disclosure requirements, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • What New Conn. Insurance Bulletin Means For Data And AI

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    A recent bulletin from the Connecticut Insurance Department concerning insurers' usage of artificial intelligence systems appears consistent with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners' gradual shift away from focusing on big data, and may potentially protect insurers from looming state requirements despite a burdensome framework, say attorneys at Day Pitney. 

  • IRS Sings New Tune: Whistleblower Form Update Is Welcome

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    In a significant reform at the Internal Revenue Service's Whistleblower Office, the recently introduced revisions to the Form 211 whistleblower award application use new technology and a more intuitive approach to streamline the process of reporting allegations of tax fraud committed by wealthy individuals and companies, says Benjamin Calitri at Kohn Kohn.

  • Corp. Transparency Act Could Survive 11th Circ. Several Ways

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    If the Eleventh Circuit upholds an Alabama federal court’s injunction against the Corporate Transparency Act, the anti-money laundering law could persist as a narrower version that could moot some constitutional challenges, but these remedies would likely generate additional regulatory or statutory ambiguities that would result in further litigation, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Macquarie Ruling Raises The Bar For Securities Fraud Claims

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last week in Macquarie Infrastructure v. Moab Partners — holding that a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule does not forbid omissions in company disclosures unless they render other statements false — is a major setback for plaintiffs pursuing securities fraud claims against corporations, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • First 10b5-1 Insider Trading Case Raises Compliance Issues

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    The ongoing case against former Ontrak CEO Terren Peizer is the U.S. Department of Justice's first insider trading prosecution based primarily on the filing of 10b5-1 plans, and has important takeaways for attorneys reviewing corporate policies on the possession of material nonpublic information, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Consumer Privacy Takeaways From FTC Extraterritorial Action

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    With what appears to be its first privacy-related consent agreement with a non-U.S. business, the Federal Trade Commission establishes that its reach is extraterritorial and that consumer internet browsing data is sensitive data, and there are lessons for any multinational business that handles consumer information, say Olivia Greer and Alexis Bello at Weil.

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

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    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

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